Methodist Churches

The Hull History Centre holds a large amount of Methodist Records for Hull, which can mostly be found under the references: C DCE, C DCM, C DCN and C DCT

Lists of which churches and which circuits are covered can be found in the Searchroom. These records are also listed on our Online Catalogue and can be searched by the name of the church/chapel in question.

The Methodist Archives and Research Centre at the John Rylands Library (Manchester University also hold a large collection of Methodist records. They can be contacted on 0161 275 3755.


List of Methodist Churches in Hull (we do not necessarily hold the records)

Alexandra Road, Beverley Road, Newland Avenue: registered by the Primitives in 1899.

Alexandra Street, Spring Bank: a mission room, used by the primitives from 1888 onwards. It was demolished in 1964 and replaced by Spring Bank.

Alfred Street, Hessle Road: replaced by the Wesleyans in 1831 to replace English Street. It is believed to have been absorbed into Great Thornton Street soon after 1851.

Alfred Gelder Street, Queen’s Hall: registered by the Wesleyans in 1905 near the site of George Yard Chapel and replacing also Humber Street. The hall was replaced by Central Hall in 1960 and was demolished in 1965.

Anlaby Road (Anlaby Park Church): a school building, used as a chapel, opened by the Wesleyans in 1914. It was replaced by a new chapel and opened in 1959.

Anlaby Road, Bourne Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1871. The chapel was deregistered in 1960 and had been demolished by 1964, when rooms in a house nearby were used for worship.

Anlaby Road (or Plane Street): a school chapel opened by the Wesleyans in 1895. It was replaced in 1910 by a new chapel.

Argyle Street, Spring Bank: registered by the Wesleyans in 1872 and replaced by Willow Grove in 1886 (Jubilee Commemorative Stepney Church). A new chapel was built here in 1895. It was deregistered in 1959 when Spring Bank was built and demolished in 1964.

Askew Avenue: a hall opened by the Wesleyans in 1930 was replaced by a chapel in 1934.

Back Ropery: a house used c.1750.

Barnsley Street, Holderness Road: a mission hall first mentioned in 1892 and registered by the Wesleyans in 1895. It was extended under Gelder and Kitchen in 1914 and destroyed by bombing in 1941.

Beverley Road: opened by the Wesleyans in 1862. The chapel was closed in 1941, subsequently used as a printing works, and burnt down in 1954.

Beverley Road (or Cave Street) Stepney or Zion Chapel: opened by the New Connexion Methodists in 1849. It was replaced by a new building in 1869. The old chapel was sold in 1878 and has subsequently been used by the Salvation Army and the Assemblies of God.

Beverley Road, Queens Road Church: opened by the Wesleyans in 1878. It was damaged during the Second World War and the adjoining schoolroom was subsequently used for worship. The old church was used as a warehouse in 1964.

Beverley Road, Stepney Chapel: opened by the New Connexion Methodists in 1869 to replace the old chapel on the corner of Cave Street.

Boulevard: opened by the Free Methodists, later the United Methodists, in 1907 to replace Osborne Street.

Bricknell Avenue: after meetings had been held for some time in a farm house, a temporary building was opened in 1944. This was replaced by a school chapel in 1953.

Brighton Street : a mission hall, built by the Primitives in 1899.

Butchery: A house used c. 1750.

Campbell Street: Built by the Free Methodists in 1866 to replace Walker Street. The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941 and closed in 1943 subsequently becoming a storehouse. It had been demolished by 1964.

Carlton Street: built by  the Wesleyans in 1865. It was replaced by a larger chapel seating 300 in 1886. It was deregistered in 1963 and was derelict in 1964.

Church Street (Sutton): replaced a Wesleyan Chapel said to have been built around 1812. The new chapel on a different site was registered  in 1860.

College Street, Sutton: replaced a Primitive chapel said to have been built in 1832, which stood in the present Chamberlain Street. The new chapel was registered in 1893. It was deregistered in 1933 and subsequently used for various purposes.

Coltman Street, Trinity Chapel: built by the Wesleyans in 1872. It was damaged by bombing in 1941 and closed, and was demolished in 1953.

Cottingham Road, Newland Chapel: opened by the Wesleyans in 1858 after meetings had for some time been held in a barn. The chapel was enlarged in 1867 and 1873, but it was replaced by a new building , on the opposite side of Newland Avenue, in 1901 and was subsequently used by
the Port of Hull Society until 1962. It was demolished in 1966.

Cottingham Road, Newland Church: a school chapel, opened by the Wesleyans in 1901. A church was opened alongside in 1928. It was damaged during the second world war but repaired.

Dansom Lane: opened by the Wesleyans in 1876. After 1920 it was used jointly with the Baptists. It was closed in 1929 and was later a warehouse, then offices.

Derringham Street: used by the Weslsyans in 1872.

Dock Street: used by the New Connexion Methodists at least from 1885 to 1900.

Durham Street: a temporary school chapel built by the Wesleyans in 1874 and replaced by Brunswick Chapel, Holderness Road in 1877 ( Brunswick Jubilee )

Edgar Street (or Mechanics Lane): built by the Primitives in 1891. It was adapted from existing Primitive premises, first mentioned in 1885. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Endike Lane: a hall opened in 1934.

English Street: believed to have replaced St. Mark’s Square Wesleyan by 1818. It was replaced by Alfred Street in 1831.

Evans Square (or Lees Walk, Beetonville): opened by the Wesleyans in 1867. The chapel was closed in 1954 and demolished c. 1960.

Fountain Road: adapted by the Wesleyans from premises first mentioned in 1888, the new mission being registered in 1895. It was replaced by King’s Hall, built on the same site in 1910. A building in Waterloo Street was temporarily used during 1910.

Fountain Road, Kings Hall: built by the Wesleyans in 1910 on the site of the Fountain Road Mission Chapel and replacing also Scott Street and Oxford Street. An extension was registered in 1915.

Fountain Road, Zion Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1877. The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941 but was again registered from 1957 to 1959, when Spring Bank was built. It had been demolished by 1964.

George Street (Mechanics Institute): a room here was used by the Wesleyan Reformers in 1851.

George Yard: registered by the Wesleyans in 1791 and said to have been built five or six years before. The chapel was replaced by Queen’s Hall, built on an adjoining site in 1905 ( see Alfred Gelder Street )

Goodwin Street: a mission room, registered by the Independent Methodist from 1934 to 1938.

Great Thornton Street: built by the Primitives in 1849. It was burnt down and rebuilt in 1856. The chapel was deregistered in 1937 and destroyed by bombing in 1941.

Great Thornton Street: opened by the Wesleyans in 1842. It was largely destroyed by fire in 1907, although one small wing survived until c. 1950, and it was replaced by Thornton Hall in 1909.

Great Thornton Street, Thornton Hall: opened by the Wesleyans in 1909 on the site of an earlier chapel. The hall was destroyed during the Second World War.

Greenwood Avenue, Clowes Memorial Church: after meetings had been held in a private house and then a school since 1942, a temporary building was opened in 1947. A new chapel was opened in 1957.

Hawthorn Avenue, Norman Memorial Church: built by the Primitives in 1905. After bomb damage in 1941 services were held in the schoolroom, but this was closed in 1955 and subsequently demolished.

Hedon Road: built by the Primitives in 1894. It replaced smaller premises in a lane to the rear, built in 1877. It was destroyed by bombing in 1941 and temporary accommodation was used until Southcoates Lane was built.

Hedon Road (Marfleet): opened by the Wesleyans in 1873. It perhaps replaced another Wesleyan meeting place in Marfleet, registered from 1861 to 1876. Hedon Road was deregistered in 1906 and replaced by Marfleet Avenue ; it was later used as a workshop and was apparently unused in 1964.

Hessle Road: built by the Primitives in 1881. The chapel was deregistered in 1933 and registered by the Elim Church in 1934.

Hessle Road (or St. George’s Road): registered by the Wesleyans in 1877 and replaced by a new building in 1883. It was enlarged in 1904. The chapel in 1942 became the Thornton Hall (St. George’s) Mission.

Hodgson Street, Cleveland Street: built by the Primitives in 1884. The chapel was apparently closed in 1940 when its accounts ceased. It was damaged by bombing during the Second World War and was used as part of a factory in 1964.

Holderness Road (or Bright Street): opened by the Primitives in 1864. The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941 and had been demolished by 1964.

Holderness Road, Brunswick Chapel: registered by the Wesleyans in 1877 to replace Durham Street. An assembly Hall added in 1886, increased the accommodation. A new building was opened on the site of the old chapel in 1962. The assembly hall was used by the National Assistance Board in 1964.

Holderness Road, Wesley Chapel: registered by the Wesleyans in 1913. The chapel was renamed Kingston Weslsy after some of the fittings had been transferred from the destroyed Kingston Chapel.

Holland Street, Bethesda Chapel : built by the Primitives in 1902. It was deregistered in 1962 when Brunswick, Holderness Road was rebuilt and was unused in 1964.

Humber Street, Wesley Chapel: built by the Wesleyans in 1833 and registered in 1835. The chapel was remodelled in 1887 and named Wesley Hall. It was replaced by Queen’s Hall in 1905 and used as an auction room before being destroyed during the Second War War. A Wesleyan mission in
1907 may have been in the old chapel.

Jarratt Street (or Kingston Square), Clowes Chapel: opened by the Primitives in 1851. The chapel was deregistered in 1932 and was used as a storehouse before being demolished in 1965.

Jennings Street (or Hood street), Witham: opened by the Wesleyans by 1818. It was amalgamated with Lime Street in 1834 and demolished in 1965.

Jennings Street , Groves Chapel: a Wesleyan mission is first mentioned in 1885. It was presumably followed by the chapel opened in 1897, replacing Lime Street from which many fittings were transferred. The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941 and not restored.

King Edward Street, Central Hall: opened in 1960 on the site of Waltham Street Chapel.

Lambert Street, Lamb Memorial Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1894, replacing a schoolroom which in 1888 had replaced Willow Grove.

Lee Smith Street, (or Hedon Road): opened by the Wesleyans in 1866. It was taken over by the Lutherians in 1910.

Lime Street: built by the Wesleyans in 1826. Its place was taken by Kingston Chapel, Witham, opened in 1841, and Lime Street later passed to the Wesleyan Reformers. In 1853 it was used as a Sunday School. It was used by the Free Methodists in the 1860’s, 1870’s and 1880’s. The chapel was
replaced by Jennings Street in 1897, in 1964 it was a storehouse.

Lincoln Street, Lockwood Street: built by the Primitives in 1872. The chapel was deregistered in 1935. It had been partially demolished by 1964 and the remainder was used as a workshop.

Lockwood Street : a mission room, registered by the Primitives from 1897 to 1906.

Lower Union Street: built by the Wesleyans in 1820 or 1828. It was given up shortly after Great Thornton Street opened in 1842. By 1851 it was used by the Independent Methodists. It was Wesleyan again in 1885 and they apparently used it until 1900. It later became a warehouse, a Jewish mission hall in 1916 and finally a synagogue in 1928.

Lower Union Street: a mission room, registered by the Wesleyans in 1882. It was apparently this one of the two Wesleyan buildings in the street which remained in use until 1910. It was then used by the Independent Methodists from 1911 to c. 1930, and in 1933 was registered as St. Victor’s
undenominational chapel.

Manor Alley: the tower of the King’s Manor was taken over from the Baptists in 1757. It was demolished and a new meeting house built in 1771, this was replaced by George Yard registered in 1791. It was used as awarehouse in 1866 and demolished in the early 20th century.

Marfleet Avenue: built by the Wesleyans in 1908 and registered in 1913, replacing Hedon Road.

Marmaduke Street: a meeting room, used by the Wesleyans at least from 1883 to 1893.

Mason Street (later Little Mason Street): built by the Wesleyans in 1826.  It was used until Kingston Chapel, Witham was opened in 1841 and then passed to the Primitives. It was later used exclusively as a school and had been demolished by 1964.

Mill Street (later West St): opened by the Primitives in 1819. The chapel was replaced by Perth Street and deregistered in 1912. It was subsequently used as a dance hall and was destroyed by bombing in 1941.

Moxon (later Spencer) Street  (or Hamilton Place) registered by the Free Methodists in 1860, it had been a congregational schoolroom. It was deregistered in 1876 but it was presumably the same building that was used by the Wesleyans at least from 1885 onwards. It was demolished in 1930.

Nestor Grove, Bilton Grange or Kingston Memorial Church: registered in 1957.

New George Street: a mission room, registered by the Primitives in 1884 and used at least until 1922.

Nile Street: taken over by the Primitives from the Baptists in 1847. It was replaced by Great Thornton Street in 1849 and was unoccupied in 1851. The Wesleyan Reformers may have used it before moving to Porter Street by 1853. It became St. Luke’s Church ( C of E ) for a period in 1856.

North Street (later Charlotte Street), Bethel Chapel: built in 1799 by the New Connexion Methodists. It was renovated in 1865 and enlarged in 1875. The chapel was destroyed by bombing in 1941.

Osborne Street: taken over by the Independent Methodists from the Baptists in 1826. It was subsequently used by the New Connexion Methodists and was replaced by Boulevard in 1907.

Oxford Street: opened by the Wesleyans in 1870 to replace York Street. It was closed when King’s Hall was opened in 1910 and subsequently used as a cinema and as offices, it had been demolished by 1964.

Pease Street: in use as an Independent Methodist Mission in 1908 – 10.

Perth Street West Memorial Church: a temporary building, opened by the Primitives in 1908 to replace West Street. A new church was built in 1931.

Porter Street : built by the Independents by 1851 and taken over by the Wesleyan Reformers by 1853. In 1855 it was replaced by Walker Street and from 1856 to 1862 was used as St. Luke’s Church ( C of E ) It was lent to the Primitives for a period in 1856 while Great Thornton Street was being rebuilt. It became a music – hall in 1864.

Portobello Street: built by the Primitives in 1906.

Preston Road: registered in 1937.

Prince’s Avenue: built by the Weslwyans in 1905.

Providence Row : a mission, used by the Weslwyans from at least 1895 to 1900, and from 1913 until at least 1937.

Raikes Street (or Church Street) (Drypool) : built by the Wesleyans in 1805 and used as a Sunday school in 1853. It was registered in 1877. The chapel was closed in 1930 because of the proximity of Kingston Chapel, Witham, but used for youth work for some years more. It was a workshop in 1964.

Redbourne Street: a mission hall, registered by the Primitives in 1932 and used as a Continuing Primitive Methodist Church.

St. George’s Road (or Beecroft Street): built by the Primitives in 1873. It is now part of the Sunday School. A new adjoining chapel was built in 1890.

St. Mark’s Square (Pottery Ground ), Potteries Chapel: opened by the Wesleyans by 1806. It was apparently replaced by English Street by 1818. It was perhaps the same building that was used by the Primitives in the 1820’s.

Scott Street: built by the Wesleyans in 1804. It was closed when the King’s Hall was opened in 1910 and was used as part of a workshop in 1964.

Selby Street: built by the Primitives in 1901, this was a later chapel, the original having been built in 1885.

South Street: the Baptist Chapel, licensed by the Primitive Methodist New Connexion in 1834 and used by a Wesleyan Reformers congregation in 1851.

Southcoates Lane: after temporary accommodation had been used following the destruction of Hedon Road in 1941 a new chapel was built in 1957.

Spring Bank, Jubilee Chapel: opened by the Primitives in 1864. The chapel was renovated in 1952 and replaced by a new building in 1959. It was then joined by Alexandra Street, Argyle Street and Fountain Road.

Stoneferry Road, Bethel Chapel: built by the Wesleyans soon after 1820, altered in 1826 and rebuilt in 1839. It was enlarged in 1881 and closed in 1892 when a new chapel was opened in this road. Part of the old building is incorporated in Stoneferry Road School.

Stoneferry Road, Emmanuel Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1871. It was used at least until 1939 but was unused in 1964.

Stoneferry Road, St. John’s Chapel: registsred by the Wesleyans in 1892, replacing Bethel Chapel in the same road.

Sykes Street, Tabernacle: an independent chapel taken over by the Wesleyans in 1835. After being used by the Presbyterians from 1838 until 1840 it was acquired by the Wesleyan Association in 1846. It was Wesleyan in 1851, Methodist Free Church for at least part of the period from 1864 to
1882 and New Connexion in 1889 and 1899 – 1900. The Primitives also had a mission in Sykes Street from 1892 to 1900 and may have used the same building. The chapel was destroyed during the Second World War.

Walker Street: used by the Wesleyan Reformers, replacing Porter Street from 1855 until Campbell Street took its place in 1866. It was registered by the Independent Methodists from 1871 to 1876. It later became Zion Calvinist Chapel.

Waller street: a mission used by the Wesleyans from 1908 to 1911.

Waltham Street: opened by the Wesleyans in 1814. It was deregistered in 1933 and subsequently used for administrative purposes, as well as by the Mildmay Mission. The chapel was damaged during the Second World War and was later demolished for Central Hall to be built on the site. (see King
Edward Street)

West Parade (Spring Bank): opened by the Wesleyans in 1874. It was replaced by Argyle Street in 1895 and used as a Sunday School until 1910. It later became a cinema and in 1964 was a warehouse.

Westcott Street: a mission, used by the Wesleyans in 1910.

Wheeler Street: a Wesleyan mission room, in use by 1883. A new building was erected in 1900. It was given up c.1960 and taken over by the Churches of God a year or two later.

Wilde Street: opened by the Free Methodists in 1876. The chapel was closed in 1911 and was used as a warehouse in 1964.

Willerby Road, Derringham Street Church: a school chapel registered in 1933. A separate chapel was built in 1958.

Williamson Street, Hodge Memorial Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1873 and registered in 1875. The chapel was closed in 1940 and was used as a warehouse in 1964, when meetings were held in Williamson Street School.

Willow Grove (off Grafton Street): a mission room opened by the Wesleyans in 1886 to replace Argyle Street. It was replaced in 1888 by a schoolroom and in 1894 by Lambert Street.

Wincolmlee (formerly Church Street): registered by the Primitives in 1819 in a building called the “Old Penitentiary“ Two houses nearby were subsequently used, and on or near the site of one of them Wincolmlee Chapel was built in 1842.

Wincolmlee (formerly Church Street): registered by the Primitives in 1842 and enlarged or rebuilt in 1846. It was replaced by Lincoln Street (Bankside, Barmston Street area) in 1872 but may have been used until 1882. It was later used as a storehouse and still stood in 1964.

Witham (or Holborn Street): the Congregational Chapel, taken over by the Primitives in 1860, replacing a farmhouse on Holderness Road . It was itself replaced by Holderness Road Chapel in 1864. It was a Temperance Hall in 1866, was later used by the Salvation Army and the Spirtualists and was a storehouse in 1964.

Witham (Holderness Court) a mission room, used by the Wesleyans at least from 1883 to 1893.

Witham, Kingston Chapel: opened by the Wesleyans in 1841. It was damahged by bombing in 1941 and later demolished.

Woodhouse Street: a mission room, used by the Primitives at least from 1889 to 1893.

York Street: a mission room, opened by the Wesleyans in 1835 and replaced by Oxford Street in 1870.